Friday Sessions are informal talks and presentations hosted by public works on Friday evenings with invited guests and friends.

CARTOGRAPHY OF THE DOMESTIC OBJECT - TALK & DISCUSSION - FRIDAY 16th OCTOBER AT 6:30PM

'Woman Sweeping' by Cornelis De Man

'Woman Sweeping' by Cornelis De Man


BALIN HOUSE PROJECTS’ AND ‘PUBLIC WORKS’ 
ARE HOSTING A DISCUSSION ON THE
‘CARTOGRAPHY OF THE DOMESTIC OBJECT’
 
FOLLOWED BY A TOUR OF 
‘MY HOME IS YOUR HOME’ AND DRINKS

FRIDAY 16th OCTOBER AT 6:30PM 
ADDRESS: Hankey Hall (Tabard Community Hall), 3 Hankey Place (off Long Lane)
Tabard Gardens Estate, Borough, SE1 4LR
 
TALKS BY: 
DR CARON LIPMAN (QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY) 
JANA SCHOLZE CURATOR OF CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE (V&A)
CHAIRED BY: OLIVIA SHERRINGHAM (QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY)
 
please rsvp: torange@publicworksgroup.net

DR CARON LIPMAN will be talking about her current research on ‘Living with the Past at Home: domestic prehabitation and inheritance’. The talk will investigate the meanings, knowledges, practices and material dimensions of living with the past at home. It considers the significance of people’s awareness of previous inhabitants, or that deemed to be inherited from them, in framing domestic belonging, ownership, and aesthetic expression in the home, and the forms of historical knowledge and historical practice that are prompted, informed by and result from this awareness.
 
JANA SCHOLZE will give a talk based the V&A exxhibition she co-curated called ‘what is luxury’? The talk will touch on the important relationship between luxury and value. Speculations about the future provide insight into how luxury is not a stable category, but has a number of meanings which are constantly changing and responding to new social, economic and ecological paradigms. For instance, in a post-industrial future where the world’s supply of petrochemicals has been exhausted, could plastic become a highly valuable material and what skills would we need to work with it? With a focus on materials, the chosen art and design objects will provoke connections of luxury to issues like access, privacy and memory. The discussion will also position the topic within the booming luxury goods market which grew from £101 billion in 2009 to £147 billion in 2014, against a backdrop of increasing social inequality.
 
DR OLIVIA SHERINGHAM  will chair the discussion. She is a social and cultural geographer involved in the research platform ’studies of home’. Her research focuses on place-making and integration, migration and religion, creolization  identity formation, and geographies of home and the city.
 
TORANGE KHONSARI from public works  will introduce the topic by a short presentation about the role of the domestic object in Balin house, where it sits between the crafted salvaged item and the digitally produced functional casing/support. 
 
please rsvp: torange@publicworksgroup.net
 
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This talks is the last of the three exploring the home. IT is part of a larger grants for the arts application and project described below:
‘My home is your home’ completed in 2014 follows from ‘Whitechapel gift shop’ project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.
Unlike the ‘Whitechapel gift shop’ which was an old saw mill, ‘My home is your home’ is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006. 

The laundry room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist’s house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public worksBalin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.  
For more information see: https://balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

ART & THE HOME

Image: Artist Do Ho Suh From Korea

Image: Artist Do Ho Suh From Korea


THE CASS IS HOSTING 'BALIN HOUSE PROJECT' AND 'PUBLIC WORKS'
WHO ARE HOLDING A DISCUSSION ON 'ART & THE HOME'

When: TUESDAY 6TH OCTOBER AT 6:30PM
Where: The Cass, 59-63 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7PF ROOM No: CE1-16

TALKS BY: PROF GILL PERRY (ART HISTORY AT OPEN UNIVERSITY)
TORANGE KHONSARI (PUBLIC WORKS)
CHAIRED BY: JES FERNIE (CURATOR)

Talk 1: Broken Homes and Haunted Houses:
The House in Contemporary Art
Prof Gill Perry

This talk explores the prevalence of the motif of the house in recent and contemporary art, focussing on the symbolic possibilities of representing 'broken' and 'haunted' houses. Drawing on material in my book Playing at Home: The House in Contemporary Art, I consider some of the ways in which artists working in installation art and video have embraced the social and aesthetic challenges of representing domestic space and the 'home'. I draw briefly on examples of British, European and American art, with a focus on the Heidelberg Project in Detroit, a collaborative evolving project involving artists and the local community. I explore representations of the house as sites of memory, social critique, community involvement, homelessness and the modern culture of the 'everyday'. Installation art is considered as critical medium for the representation of the house and home, as a 'living art' inflected with issues of gender, identity, migration, belonging, social critique and community involvement. Although some previous studies have explored ideas of the surreal or uncanny nature of artistic re-workings of the house, I argue that playful, parodic and participatory practices are central to many representations of the theme. I argue for the recurrence in contemporary art of humorous, playful and subversive (and sometimes destructive) practices that enrich the seemingly banal, 'everyday' themes of the house and home.

Gill Perry is Professor of Art History at the Open University and chair of The Open Arts Archive (http://www.openartsarchive.org). Her books include: Women Artists and the Parisian Avant-Garde, MUP, 1995; Gender and Art, ed., Yale UP, 1999; Difference and Excess in Contemporary Art, ed., Blackwells, 2003; Themes in Contemporary Art, co-ed with Paul Wood; Spectacular Flirtations: Viewing the Actress in British Art 1768-1820, Yale UP, 2007, The First Actresses, NPG, 2011-12; Playing at Home: The House in Contemporary Art, Reaktion Books, 2013. Her forthcoming book is titled Playing – with Michael Landy, Ridinghouse, 2016.

Talk 2: Public Homes:
The Home as artistic practice
Torange Khonsari

This talk will explore how in close collaboration with home owners, the home is designed to contribute to the informal cultural offering of the city away from the established voices that celebrate or destroy art. Through informal cultural practices, the home becomes the extension of the public arena of the city, offering itself to strangers as a place of hosting, conflict, debate and unexpected encounters. It becomes a place that values generosity, operates on an economy of gift exchange, celebrates and experiments with forms of cultural practice that the establishment is too risk averse to approach. The design of the Home, its spatial configurations, its domestic utilities are entwined between the world of the domestic home and the public gallery. What can a home as artistic practice offer the city?

Torange Khonsari obtained her professional Diploma at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London - July 1998.In 2004 she co founded the art and architecture practice public works, an interdisciplinary practice working in the threshold of participatory and performative art, architecture and related fields of anthropology, always engaged with notions of civic in the city. Their projects are socially and politically motivated and directly impacts public space, working with local organisations, communities, government bodies and stakeholders. As a practice it is a vehicle and an umbrella that both hosts and tests the academic research undertaken within university teaching. Torange is currently a director of public works, and teaches architecture at London Metropolitan University (The Cass). The direct two -way communication between academia and practice has enabled and enriched an exploratory environment within which public works is now operating. Published work include 'public works enjoying the in between' in publication planning the unplanned, 'contemporary initiative in participatory art and architecture practice', Open house international publication.

Chair: Jes Fernie
Jes Fernie is an independent curator and writer based in Colchester, East Anglia. She works with galleries, architectural practices and public realm organisations on public programmes, commissioning schemes and residency projects across the UK. Working primarily beyond gallery walls, she is interested in an expansive idea of contemporary artistic practice, which encompasses dialogue, research, engagement and serendipity. She is a member of many art commissioning selection panels and has worked with organisations including firstsite, Tate, Peer, Serpentine Gallery, Olympic Delivery Authority, Hawkins\Brown Architects, St Paul's Cathedral, Central St Martins, University of Essex and the RCA.

This talks is the second of the three exploring the home. It is part of a larger grants for the arts funded project described below:

'My home is your home' completed in 2014 follows from 'Whitechapel gift shop' project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.

Unlike the 'Whitechapel gift shop' which was an old saw mill, 'My home is your home' is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006.

The Laundry Room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist's house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public works, Balin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.
For more information see:

https://balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

THE CIVIC HOME

The birth of Caterina Cornaro c1550-1600. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

The birth of Caterina Cornaro c1550-1600. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


THE CASS IS HOSTING 'BALIN HOUSE PROJECT' AND 'PUBLIC WORKS'
WHO ARE HOLDING A DISCUSSION ON THE CIVIC HOME

FRIDAY 25th SEPTEMBER AT 6:30PM
ADDRESS: The Cass, 59-63 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7PF ROOM No: CE1-16

TALKS BY: PROF JANE RENDELL (UCL) AND PROF PETER CARL (LMU)
CHAIRED BY: OLIVER WAINWRIGHT (GUARDIAN)

RSVP to Torange@publicworksgroup.net

PROF. JANE RENDELL will talk about different examples of home used as a psychoanalytic setting. She will also look at the social condenser as a communal space in the housing schemes of the constructivists, and how this model was then adapted in the welfare state architecture for often more pragamatic purposes. The talk will highlight what the closure of spaces such as - laundries and community halls, means in symbolic as well as political terms, set in the context of the destruction of social housing. Jane Rendell is an academic and writer with a training in architectural design and history, whose work crosses architecture, art, feminism, history and psychoanalysis. Her talk will focus on various spaces of overlap between public and private, specifically configurations of the psychoanalytic setting and the social condenser as sites of potential transformation – psychic and cultural. Jane is Professor of Architecture and Art at the Bartlett, UCL. http://www.janerendell.co.uk/

PROF. PETER CARL's talk will address the fact that for most of history the house lay at the heart of civic life, still preserved in the 'Houses' of Parliament. However, this history also corresponds to a different form of civic life, termed a 'natural state' by North, Wallis and Weingast (Violence and Social Orders), in contrast to the present conditions of advanced capitalism, which they term 'open access'. The latter's reliance upon an aggregate of local, often ephemeral public associations, from knitting-circles to charities and anti-development protest-groups to more elaborate associations of, for example, universities and industry, grew up alongside the fascination with privacy, concentrated around the domestic realm. If privacy culminates in mass housing-estates and David Lynch, it is also the case that very little of a city is wholly private. In contrast to the notion of 'public realm' as mostly outdoors or transport interchanges (amplified by architects' and planners' use of figure-field diagrams), a spectrum of public life prevails, which certain architectural configurations support better than others.

This talks is the first of the 3 exploring the home and is part of a larger project described below:

'My home is your home' completed in 2014 follows from 'Whitechapel gift shop' project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.

Unlike the 'Whitechapel gift shop' which was an old saw mill, 'My home is your home' is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006.

The laundry room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist's house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public works, Balin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.

For more information see: www.balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

HELP US SAVE R-URBAN IN COLUMBUS PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE THE PETITION!


PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION HERE & CIRCULATE!

For the last three years public works has been collaborating with Atelier d'Architecture Autogérée (AAA), on R-Urban an internationally acclaimed professional and citizen initiative of resilient regeneration in Colombes, near Paris and in Hackney Wick, east London.

AAA along with many local, national and international collaborators established this unique project consisting of an urban agriculture site 'Agrocite' and a recycling centre 'Recyclub'. The new municipal government of Colombes wants to replace R-Urban with a temporary car park and destroy this exemplary project as soon as September 2015.

We urgently need all your help to stop this from happening and persuade the municipality and other interested authorities to preserve this project. Please sign the petition, circulate in your networks and get people to support R-Urban.

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION HERE & CIRCULATE! ... and don't forget to write a reasons for your support along with your signature.

- Thanks you all for you support -

#saveRURBAN - Réseau de pratiques citoyennes résilientes from atelier d'architecture autogérée on Vimeo.

URBAN ENERGY AND THE SHARING ECONOMY, Friday 5th of June from 7pm at the German Deli in Hackney Wick.


Join us for a series of events about community energy, resource sharing and the opportunity to get involved in building a small scale anaerobic digester (AD).

Anaerobic digesters turn waste into energy, and this project is all about learning how we can make energy from the resources we find in an urban neighbourhood.

Community energy is a growing phenomenon; for example local groups are starting to collectively buy solar panels, or invest in wind turbines, and get involved in green energy production. It's still rare in urban areas, even though cities are full of low carbon sources of energy like biomass from thrown away food. Making energy in the city is hard, it means finding technologies that can be tailored to specific local sites and resources. Technologies like AD exist, but research suggests the technical challenge of turning urban waste into energy is far less than the challenge of supporting people who want to attempt this.

We want to address that challenge and are proposing to develop and build a small scale Anaerobic Digester in the Olympic Park that uses local organic waste to create heat, power and fertiliser. The project is free to join and open to all those who are interested in local energy and zero waste societies, or who just want to know more.

Over the coming months we will be organising a series of events to learn more about the process, identify some resources in the neighbourhood and discuss more broadly the issues of community energy, low waste society and the sharing economy. We'll also be recruiting volunteers who want to join in a set of hands-on building workshops to construct a fully functioning small scale Anaerobic Digester.

The first event in this series will bring together three speakers and will offer a good opportunity to learn about the broader context community energy and find out how to get involved in the project.

Speakers include:

Teresa Domenech Aparisi, who will talk about closed loop economies and how we can minimize waste.
public works and Charlotte Johnson will introduce the project to build a micro Anaerobic Digester.

The project takes places as part of R-Urban Wick project and is a collaboration between UCL's Institute for Sustainable Resources, art and architecture group public works and LEAP, a specialist in designing and building Micro AD for community groups. The events will be led by Charlotte Johnson from UCL and public works who will also produce the supporting material and written outputs to raise awareness of the potential for urban community energy.

The project is funded through UCL's Public Engagement Unit as part of UCL's EPSRC Impact Acceleration Award (EP/K503745/1). It has the support of the London Legacy Development Agency who are the planning authority for the QEOP.

Friday 5th of June 2015
7-9Pm  
German Deli
Unit1, Hamlet Industrial Estate
96 White Post Lane
London
E9 5EN

HACKNEY WICK AND FISH ISLAND: FUTURE(S) PERFECT Workshop

workshop exploring the past and future imaginings ofHackneyWickand Fish Island


Sandwiched between a dual carriageway and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Hackney Wick and Fish Island have for some time been bastions of alternative living and working in the London.  
The onset of the development of the Olympic legacy has led many – including developers, local authorities, residents and the media - to speculate on the possible future of the area, leading to a cacophony of multiple, contradictory and even conflictive visions, with various different interests and desires being mapped onto the neighbourhoods...


Workshop Facilitators

Andreas Lang 
is an architect, and educator. He is a co-founder of London based practice Public Works which operates in between the fields of art, architecture and design. Public Works' projects explore how the urban public realm can be shaped by its users, through participation and co-production.

Mara Ferreri 
is an urban researcher interested in the potential of temporary art/activist practices in spaces of contested urban transformation. She completed her PhD thesis, titled 'Occupying Vacant Spaces: Precarious Politics of Temporary Urban Reuse', in the School of Geography at QMUL, where she is currently a post-doctoral research assistant.

Rhiannon Firth 
is post-doctoral research fellow at the Cass School of Education and Communities at the University of East London. Her work focuses on alternative lifestyles, utopias, social movements and counter-culture and the relationship to politics, participation and social change

Venue: Stour space 7 roach road, hackney wick, london, e3 2pa 
Booking: The event is free but places are limited, please book your seat here