Friday Sessions are informal talks and presentations hosted by public works on Friday evenings with invited guests and friends.

FS_22 'Ways of Learning' with Architecture sans Frontières. Friday 26th of Oct 2007 at 19.00

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'Ways of Learning' is an evening of talks and discussion which will uncover three diverse ways in which architects are engaging with international development and defining their roles within it. The evening will explore experiences gained through being; facilitators of the Architecture sans Frontieres-UK international education programme; a volunteer with Shelter Center; and a tutor at the recent Global Studio in Johannesburg.

WAYS OF LEARNING
Architecture sans Frontières-UK (ASF-UK) was established to bridge the gap between the building profession and how they work in long-term development and post-disaster reconstruction.

Melissa Kinnear finished her architecture studies in South Africa 1999. She has worked in a variety of architectural offices mostly focusing on housing projects with a strong commitment to sustainable design. Melissa currently tutors at Oxford Brookes University in the Development and Emergency Practice design studio for undergraduates and is a Programme Director for ASF-UK.

Jeni Burnell completed her architecture studies in Australia 2000. Throughout her career she has been driven by the social component of the profession which has lead her to be involved with community building projects in Australia and Nepal as well as consulting for the British Red Cross for their Tsunami Recovery programme. Jeni has been involved with ASF-UK since October 2006 where she works as a Programme Director.

APPLYING ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION TO DISASTER RELIEF
Shelter Centre was founded by Tom Corsellis, who co-founded the informal University of Cambridge shelterproject group, and Antonella Vitale, who worked with shelterproject ot develop the 'Transitional Settlement - Displaced Populations' guidelines published by Oxfam Publishing in May 2005.

The main aims of Shelter Centre are focused around the research, development, dissemination and operational implementation of humanitarian settlement and shelter policy, best practice, equipment and field programmes, namely working independently of, in collaboration with, or consultant to other humanitarian organisations and research institutions in research, emergency and developmental contexts.

Kiri Langmead is a fifth year architecture student at Sheffield University. During her 2 years out, she worked at Comprehensive Design Architects, in Tanzania on a design and building accommodation project for a vocational training centre. She has also been involved in landscape design and land regeneration projects at Groundwork recently completed her internship with Shelter Centre.

DRAWING IT TOGETHER
Global Studio is a project initiated by the UN Millennium Project Task Force on improving the Lives of Slum Dwellers in 2004. It was developed by the University of Sydney, Columbia University, and the University of Rome. Global Studio brings together city building professionals, educators and students from around the world.

They aim to work with and learn from communities and individuals experiencing disadvantage and/or social exclusion; develop appropriate participatory design and planning skills; encourage participants to take home lessons learned; Create global networks of professionals, educators and students; Encourage universities and professional organizations to address the MDGs, through educational programs and practice; Stimulate on-going research and action; contribute to the effective implementation of the MDGs.

Elena Pascolo tutored at the Johannesburg Global Studio in 2007.

FS_12 IF-[untitled] Architects

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Recent projects in the international development and emergency relief sector

IF-[ untitled ] architects [Martha Giannakopoulou, Annika Grafweg, Seki Hirano] will present and discuss the role of the architect within an international development and emergency relief sector, relating to their most recent commissions from Architects for Aid and Oxfam GB.

The presentation will include the design and construction of a new school building in India; and the facilitation of a participatory framework for planning a sustainable young people's village.
They will also show their work as a shelter coordinator for the reconstruction of Tsunami emergency response program in Indonesia.

IF-[ untitled ] architects is a London and Athens based studio established in 2003 who are active in various architectural and participation lead projects within the international development and the private sector.

For more information visit www.if-untitled.com

FS_06 'The Urban Village' by Crisis

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CRISIS is a national charity that fights homelessness and empowers homeless people to fulfill their potential and transform their lives. With Urban Village CRISIS has developed a new model for sustainable communities with affordable homes for low income essential workers and formerly homeless adults.

Urban Village is:

- An innovative concept for socially mixed communities based on tried and tested model from New York
- High quality permanent housing with onsite holistic support and opportunities for work and well being
- A cost effective solution, which tackles multiple agendas across local and central government

Located on the City Fringe in Tower Hamlets, Urban Village will create 270 units of permanent affordable housing for a mixed community of low income workers and homeless adults unable to move on from an overcrowded hostel system. Urban Village will not only provide high quality, environmentally friendly housing, it will also boast integrated onsite support services including healthy living, training, and employment opportunities. Support services include the New Mildmay Hospital serving people living with AIDS, a Primary Healthcare and 8 bed Detox Centre, and the New Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church.

Urban Village is based on a successful model pioneered by Common Ground Community in New York in 1990. Common Ground currently operates 1500 units. In 2005, New York City government committed to delivering 9,000 more units.