Friday Sessions are informal talks and presentations hosted by public works on Friday evenings with invited guests and friends.

FS_27 - 'I love the Olympics' - Friday 25th of April 2008, 19.00

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Friday the 25th of April 2008, 19.00 at public works
With Contributions by: Ana Méndez de Andés, Optimistic Productions, Games Monitor and others

Initiated by Ana Méndez de Andés this Friday Session will bring together a number of practitioners and activist that have an interest in the Olympic development currently underway in Stratford. The evening of presentations will be a departing point for the articulation of a possible 'action' that addesses the Olympic site and its surroundings.

Ana Méndez de Andés will present the video I love the M30 by the Madrid-based collectives areaciega and basurama as well as a brief introduction of the conflicts and resistances in Madrid as analysed by the Observatorio Metropolitano in the book Madrid ¿la suma de todos? I love the M30 documents an action that took place in November 2006 involving an open top tourist bus, 35 activists, the biggest and most expensive construction site in Madrid, a jazz band and a very devoted driver.

In 2007 Hilary Powell and Dan Edelstyn from Optimistic Productions made the film 'The Games' staging an alternative Olympics within the sites now enclosed by the blue hoardings. Carrying on their engagement with the Olympic zone they will present their work with 'Olympic Spirits and Foodstuffs Ltd' providing an introduction to the company's product range and ethos.

Hilary together with George Unsworth from Space Studios will also talk about the Olympic Artists Forum, an information and events platform for artists and creative practitioners engaging with the Olympics and the changing cultural landscape of London.

Games Monitor is a network of people raising awareness about issues within the London Olympic development processes. Highlighting the local, London and international implications of the Olympic industry. Games Monitor seeks to deconstruct the 'fantastic' hype of Olympic boosterism and the eager complicity of the 'urban elites' in politics, business, the media, sport, academia and local institutional 'community stakeholders'. The work of this network is mostly articulated and accessible through their web site: www.gamesmonitor.org.uk For this Friday Session Martin Slavin as well as other participants of gamesmonitor will be present.

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Ana Méndez de Andés is member and founder of two interconnected militant-research collectives in Madrid: areaciega develops a collective research on mapping of public spaces focusing on the emergence of self-organised social processes and has been funded by arteleku, Center for Contemporary Creation in San Sebastian while the Observatorio Metropolitano was born in 2005 as a cluster of micro-investigations with the intention of giving an account of the big transformations of the contemporary metropolis under the light of globalization and the resistances against it. As landscape architect, she is currently working in London at Kathryn Gustafson´s office and has her own practice under the name of malashierbas

Hilary Powell is a Hackney based artist whose interdisciplinary practice combines rigorous urban research with event based practices and film. Her background in Fine Art and Scenography led her out into derelict sites across Europe (from empty swimming pools in London to Amsterdam Docklands and Berlin factories) creating site responsive theatrical installation events. She has a PhD in Cultural Studies from Goldsmith's College, University of London and her research and practice consistently focuses on urban 'junkspaces' and sites of large-scale regeneration.

Hilary is partner in the film company Optimistic Productions with Dan Edelstyn fusing professionalism and creativity. Dan is an experienced Director / Producer and makes innovative documentaries for C4 and C5. Projects range from a feature film involving Ukrainian exile and alcohol to a series exploring the future of Britain through the predictions of 'Seaside Seers' but a key element of their work remains engaged with various urban practices documenting and creating a vision of the city as a site for playful intervention.