Friday Sessions are informal talks and presentations hosted by public works on Friday evenings with invited guests and friends.

THE ARCHIVE OF ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS - FRIDAY 10TH OF FEBRUARY - THE CIVIC UNIVERSITY AT TATE EXCHANGE


The Friday Session will take place as part of the  Civic University at Tate Exchange
 
Friday 10th of February 6.30pm - 8pm
Tate Exchange - 5th Floor
Switch House - Tate Modern
 
Five speakers from different pedagogical backgrounds talking about learning environments where knowledge is shared and generated.
 
public works - Civic University 
Introducing the Civic University specifically within the context of the schools we have so far found offering alternative education models and arenas of learning. 
 
Prof Robert Mull - Global Practice Programme. Prof Robert Mull led The Free Unit at the Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design since 2004 and is currently developing the Global Practice Programme with international educational, NGO and institutional partners including the Civic University. Robert will explore concepts of educational freedom and duty based on his recent work within the European refugee crisis. 
 
Kathrin Böhm - Eco Nomadic School (aka Learn To Act)
The Eco Nomadic School (since 2009) is a pan-European network for local knowledge production and trans-local knowledge exchange.
Partners include amongst others atelier d’architecture autogerée (F), Myvillages (NL), Brave New Alps (IT) and APTNV (RO). The upcoming ‘'Learn to Act" publication (June 2017) documents and describes its ongoing but geographically dispersed structure of the school, local curricula and civic pedagogy, international set-up and knowledge sharing as an act of commoning.
 
Raumlabor - Urban School Ruhr (USR)
Markus Bader will talk about The Urban School Ruhr (USR) is a free learning platform and a pedagogical experiment that investigates participative and artistic practices in urban space. USR is envisioned as an independent public institution and an assembly of individuals gathered together around a declared common interest. The USR curriculum comprises field trips to European cities and an Open Programme that takes place in the cities of Witten and Hattingen, thus it engages with the present and the future of the Ruhr area. USR is a complex educational program of the Open Raumlabor University developed in cooperation with Urbane Künste Ruhr (Artistic direction: Katja Aßmann)
 
Dr. Pablo de Soto - #DroneHackademy
#DroneHackademy is a hacktivist temporary school and critical theory platform for the use of unmanned aerial vehicles as a social technology. The first edition occurred in Rio de Janeiro to support the struggle of Vila Autódromo, a local community alongside the Olympic Park that resisted eviction. An aerial cartography was produced to show real state violence by the local government and construction companies.
 

ALEJANDRO HAIEK / THE PUBLIC MACHINERY - MONDAY 4TH APRIL 7.30PM, THE WHITE BUILDING


THE PUBLIC MACHINERY
BY ALEJANDRO HAIEK

We are delighted to welcome Venezuelan architect and artist Alejandro Haiek from LabProFab for an evening presentation at the White Building.
Alejandro - alongside diverse arts groups, urban activists and grassroots movements - created The Public Machinery project: a series of social artifacts and cultural infrastructures. This was conceived as participatory, political and economic reengineering with a bottom-up approach focused on the democratisation of the urban soil and the renewal and resuscitation of inactive and non-regulated landscapes in Caracas favelas.

Alejandro Haiek works between the fields of art, architecture and activism. He is professor at the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, Central University of Venezuela, and founder of LabProFab.

Join us for an informal talk with some drinks at the White Building in Hackney Wick.

WHEN:
4th of April 2016
7.30pm-9pm 

WHERE:
The White Building
Unit 7 Queens Yard
White Post Lane
London E9 5EN

HOW MUCH:
Wick Sessions are free and open to anyone who wants to take part. Venues change with every evening.

CARTOGRAPHY OF THE DOMESTIC OBJECT - TALK & DISCUSSION - FRIDAY 16th OCTOBER AT 6:30PM

'Woman Sweeping' by Cornelis De Man
'Woman Sweeping' by Cornelis De Man

BALIN HOUSE PROJECTS’ AND ‘PUBLIC WORKS’ 
ARE HOSTING A DISCUSSION ON THE
‘CARTOGRAPHY OF THE DOMESTIC OBJECT’
 
FOLLOWED BY A TOUR OF 
‘MY HOME IS YOUR HOME’ AND DRINKS

FRIDAY 16th OCTOBER AT 6:30PM 
ADDRESS: Hankey Hall (Tabard Community Hall), 3 Hankey Place (off Long Lane)
Tabard Gardens Estate, Borough, SE1 4LR
 
TALKS BY: 
DR CARON LIPMAN (QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY) 
JANA SCHOLZE CURATOR OF CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE (V&A)
CHAIRED BY: OLIVIA SHERRINGHAM (QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY)
 
please rsvp: torange@publicworksgroup.net

DR CARON LIPMAN will be talking about her current research on ‘Living with the Past at Home: domestic prehabitation and inheritance’. The talk will investigate the meanings, knowledges, practices and material dimensions of living with the past at home. It considers the significance of people’s awareness of previous inhabitants, or that deemed to be inherited from them, in framing domestic belonging, ownership, and aesthetic expression in the home, and the forms of historical knowledge and historical practice that are prompted, informed by and result from this awareness.
 
JANA SCHOLZE will give a talk based the V&A exxhibition she co-curated called ‘what is luxury’? The talk will touch on the important relationship between luxury and value. Speculations about the future provide insight into how luxury is not a stable category, but has a number of meanings which are constantly changing and responding to new social, economic and ecological paradigms. For instance, in a post-industrial future where the world’s supply of petrochemicals has been exhausted, could plastic become a highly valuable material and what skills would we need to work with it? With a focus on materials, the chosen art and design objects will provoke connections of luxury to issues like access, privacy and memory. The discussion will also position the topic within the booming luxury goods market which grew from £101 billion in 2009 to £147 billion in 2014, against a backdrop of increasing social inequality.
 
DR OLIVIA SHERINGHAM  will chair the discussion. She is a social and cultural geographer involved in the research platform ’studies of home’. Her research focuses on place-making and integration, migration and religion, creolization  identity formation, and geographies of home and the city.
 
TORANGE KHONSARI from public works  will introduce the topic by a short presentation about the role of the domestic object in Balin house, where it sits between the crafted salvaged item and the digitally produced functional casing/support. 
 
please rsvp: torange@publicworksgroup.net
 
---
 
This talks is the last of the three exploring the home. IT is part of a larger grants for the arts application and project described below:
‘My home is your home’ completed in 2014 follows from ‘Whitechapel gift shop’ project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.
Unlike the ‘Whitechapel gift shop’ which was an old saw mill, ‘My home is your home’ is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006. 

The laundry room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist’s house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public worksBalin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.  
For more information see: https://balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

ART & THE HOME

Image: Artist Do Ho Suh From Korea
Image: Artist Do Ho Suh From Korea

THE CASS IS HOSTING 'BALIN HOUSE PROJECT' AND 'PUBLIC WORKS'
WHO ARE HOLDING A DISCUSSION ON 'ART & THE HOME'

When: TUESDAY 6TH OCTOBER AT 6:30PM
Where: The Cass, 59-63 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7PF ROOM No: CE1-16

TALKS BY: PROF GILL PERRY (ART HISTORY AT OPEN UNIVERSITY)
TORANGE KHONSARI (PUBLIC WORKS)
CHAIRED BY: JES FERNIE (CURATOR)

Talk 1: Broken Homes and Haunted Houses:
The House in Contemporary Art
Prof Gill Perry

This talk explores the prevalence of the motif of the house in recent and contemporary art, focussing on the symbolic possibilities of representing 'broken' and 'haunted' houses. Drawing on material in my book Playing at Home: The House in Contemporary Art, I consider some of the ways in which artists working in installation art and video have embraced the social and aesthetic challenges of representing domestic space and the 'home'. I draw briefly on examples of British, European and American art, with a focus on the Heidelberg Project in Detroit, a collaborative evolving project involving artists and the local community. I explore representations of the house as sites of memory, social critique, community involvement, homelessness and the modern culture of the 'everyday'. Installation art is considered as critical medium for the representation of the house and home, as a 'living art' inflected with issues of gender, identity, migration, belonging, social critique and community involvement. Although some previous studies have explored ideas of the surreal or uncanny nature of artistic re-workings of the house, I argue that playful, parodic and participatory practices are central to many representations of the theme. I argue for the recurrence in contemporary art of humorous, playful and subversive (and sometimes destructive) practices that enrich the seemingly banal, 'everyday' themes of the house and home.

Gill Perry is Professor of Art History at the Open University and chair of The Open Arts Archive (http://www.openartsarchive.org). Her books include: Women Artists and the Parisian Avant-Garde, MUP, 1995; Gender and Art, ed., Yale UP, 1999; Difference and Excess in Contemporary Art, ed., Blackwells, 2003; Themes in Contemporary Art, co-ed with Paul Wood; Spectacular Flirtations: Viewing the Actress in British Art 1768-1820, Yale UP, 2007, The First Actresses, NPG, 2011-12; Playing at Home: The House in Contemporary Art, Reaktion Books, 2013. Her forthcoming book is titled Playing – with Michael Landy, Ridinghouse, 2016.

Talk 2: Public Homes:
The Home as artistic practice
Torange Khonsari

This talk will explore how in close collaboration with home owners, the home is designed to contribute to the informal cultural offering of the city away from the established voices that celebrate or destroy art. Through informal cultural practices, the home becomes the extension of the public arena of the city, offering itself to strangers as a place of hosting, conflict, debate and unexpected encounters. It becomes a place that values generosity, operates on an economy of gift exchange, celebrates and experiments with forms of cultural practice that the establishment is too risk averse to approach. The design of the Home, its spatial configurations, its domestic utilities are entwined between the world of the domestic home and the public gallery. What can a home as artistic practice offer the city?

Torange Khonsari obtained her professional Diploma at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London - July 1998.In 2004 she co founded the art and architecture practice public works, an interdisciplinary practice working in the threshold of participatory and performative art, architecture and related fields of anthropology, always engaged with notions of civic in the city. Their projects are socially and politically motivated and directly impacts public space, working with local organisations, communities, government bodies and stakeholders. As a practice it is a vehicle and an umbrella that both hosts and tests the academic research undertaken within university teaching. Torange is currently a director of public works, and teaches architecture at London Metropolitan University (The Cass). The direct two -way communication between academia and practice has enabled and enriched an exploratory environment within which public works is now operating. Published work include 'public works enjoying the in between' in publication planning the unplanned, 'contemporary initiative in participatory art and architecture practice', Open house international publication.

Chair: Jes Fernie
Jes Fernie is an independent curator and writer based in Colchester, East Anglia. She works with galleries, architectural practices and public realm organisations on public programmes, commissioning schemes and residency projects across the UK. Working primarily beyond gallery walls, she is interested in an expansive idea of contemporary artistic practice, which encompasses dialogue, research, engagement and serendipity. She is a member of many art commissioning selection panels and has worked with organisations including firstsite, Tate, Peer, Serpentine Gallery, Olympic Delivery Authority, Hawkins\Brown Architects, St Paul's Cathedral, Central St Martins, University of Essex and the RCA.

This talks is the second of the three exploring the home. It is part of a larger grants for the arts funded project described below:

'My home is your home' completed in 2014 follows from 'Whitechapel gift shop' project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.

Unlike the 'Whitechapel gift shop' which was an old saw mill, 'My home is your home' is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006.

The Laundry Room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist's house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public works, Balin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.
For more information see:

https://balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

THE CIVIC HOME

The birth of Caterina Cornaro c1550-1600. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston
The birth of Caterina Cornaro c1550-1600. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

THE CASS IS HOSTING 'BALIN HOUSE PROJECT' AND 'PUBLIC WORKS'
WHO ARE HOLDING A DISCUSSION ON THE CIVIC HOME

FRIDAY 25th SEPTEMBER AT 6:30PM
ADDRESS: The Cass, 59-63 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7PF ROOM No: CE1-16

TALKS BY: PROF JANE RENDELL (UCL) AND PROF PETER CARL (LMU)
CHAIRED BY: OLIVER WAINWRIGHT (GUARDIAN)

RSVP to Torange@publicworksgroup.net

PROF. JANE RENDELL will talk about different examples of home used as a psychoanalytic setting. She will also look at the social condenser as a communal space in the housing schemes of the constructivists, and how this model was then adapted in the welfare state architecture for often more pragamatic purposes. The talk will highlight what the closure of spaces such as - laundries and community halls, means in symbolic as well as political terms, set in the context of the destruction of social housing. Jane Rendell is an academic and writer with a training in architectural design and history, whose work crosses architecture, art, feminism, history and psychoanalysis. Her talk will focus on various spaces of overlap between public and private, specifically configurations of the psychoanalytic setting and the social condenser as sites of potential transformation – psychic and cultural. Jane is Professor of Architecture and Art at the Bartlett, UCL. http://www.janerendell.co.uk/

PROF. PETER CARL's talk will address the fact that for most of history the house lay at the heart of civic life, still preserved in the 'Houses' of Parliament. However, this history also corresponds to a different form of civic life, termed a 'natural state' by North, Wallis and Weingast (Violence and Social Orders), in contrast to the present conditions of advanced capitalism, which they term 'open access'. The latter's reliance upon an aggregate of local, often ephemeral public associations, from knitting-circles to charities and anti-development protest-groups to more elaborate associations of, for example, universities and industry, grew up alongside the fascination with privacy, concentrated around the domestic realm. If privacy culminates in mass housing-estates and David Lynch, it is also the case that very little of a city is wholly private. In contrast to the notion of 'public realm' as mostly outdoors or transport interchanges (amplified by architects' and planners' use of figure-field diagrams), a spectrum of public life prevails, which certain architectural configurations support better than others.

This talks is the first of the 3 exploring the home and is part of a larger project described below:

'My home is your home' completed in 2014 follows from 'Whitechapel gift shop' project in 2010 and is the second in the public home series by public works. Public homes are privately commissioned architectural projects that work collaboratively with clients to negotiate the privacy of the home and levels of publicness it can offer to the city. It looks at a home as a public asset and the home owner as a public agent. In both projects, the homes have been opened up as informal cultural places, for artist residency, site specific performances, art commissions, talks and debates and symbolic demolitions.

Unlike the 'Whitechapel gift shop' which was an old saw mill, 'My home is your home' is a flat in an ex-local authority flat in Borough – London. In the 1980s due to an accident in one of the laundry rooms where a small boy died ,Southwark council closed and locked all the laundry rooms. Artist Eduardo Padhill moved to an adjacent flat, negotiated access and set up an exhibition in the laundry room, opening it up to the public once again. This started The Balin House Projects in 2006.

The laundry room had its limitation due to its very small dimensions and lack of a link to the artist's house. In 2012 Padilha bought the laundry room to expand both his home and this art space. Post expansion Balin House Projects has become an artist space where Padilha hosts discussions and debates over Sunday lunch. Last month the project was awarded a grants for the arts to explore the potentials, limitations and conflicts of an art/home. Collaboratively with public works, Balin House Projects will critically look at the home as an artistic practice through its architecture, an artist commission, series of talks and workshops.

For more information see: www.balinhouseprojects.wordpress.com

HELP US SAVE R-URBAN IN COLUMBUS PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE THE PETITION!


PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION HERE & CIRCULATE!

For the last three years public works has been collaborating with Atelier d'Architecture Autogérée (AAA), on R-Urban an internationally acclaimed professional and citizen initiative of resilient regeneration in Colombes, near Paris and in Hackney Wick, east London.

AAA along with many local, national and international collaborators established this unique project consisting of an urban agriculture site 'Agrocite' and a recycling centre 'Recyclub'. The new municipal government of Colombes wants to replace R-Urban with a temporary car park and destroy this exemplary project as soon as September 2015.

We urgently need all your help to stop this from happening and persuade the municipality and other interested authorities to preserve this project. Please sign the petition, circulate in your networks and get people to support R-Urban.

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION HERE & CIRCULATE! ... and don't forget to write a reasons for your support along with your signature.

- Thanks you all for you support -

#saveRURBAN - Réseau de pratiques citoyennes résilientes from atelier d'architecture autogérée on Vimeo.

URBAN ENERGY AND THE SHARING ECONOMY, Friday 5th of June from 7pm at the German Deli in Hackney Wick.


Join us for a series of events about community energy, resource sharing and the opportunity to get involved in building a small scale anaerobic digester (AD).

Anaerobic digesters turn waste into energy, and this project is all about learning how we can make energy from the resources we find in an urban neighbourhood.

Community energy is a growing phenomenon; for example local groups are starting to collectively buy solar panels, or invest in wind turbines, and get involved in green energy production. It's still rare in urban areas, even though cities are full of low carbon sources of energy like biomass from thrown away food. Making energy in the city is hard, it means finding technologies that can be tailored to specific local sites and resources. Technologies like AD exist, but research suggests the technical challenge of turning urban waste into energy is far less than the challenge of supporting people who want to attempt this.

We want to address that challenge and are proposing to develop and build a small scale Anaerobic Digester in the Olympic Park that uses local organic waste to create heat, power and fertiliser. The project is free to join and open to all those who are interested in local energy and zero waste societies, or who just want to know more.

Over the coming months we will be organising a series of events to learn more about the process, identify some resources in the neighbourhood and discuss more broadly the issues of community energy, low waste society and the sharing economy. We'll also be recruiting volunteers who want to join in a set of hands-on building workshops to construct a fully functioning small scale Anaerobic Digester.

The first event in this series will bring together three speakers and will offer a good opportunity to learn about the broader context community energy and find out how to get involved in the project.

Speakers include:

Teresa Domenech Aparisi, who will talk about closed loop economies and how we can minimize waste.
public works and Charlotte Johnson will introduce the project to build a micro Anaerobic Digester.

The project takes places as part of R-Urban Wick project and is a collaboration between UCL's Institute for Sustainable Resources, art and architecture group public works and LEAP, a specialist in designing and building Micro AD for community groups. The events will be led by Charlotte Johnson from UCL and public works who will also produce the supporting material and written outputs to raise awareness of the potential for urban community energy.

The project is funded through UCL's Public Engagement Unit as part of UCL's EPSRC Impact Acceleration Award (EP/K503745/1). It has the support of the London Legacy Development Agency who are the planning authority for the QEOP.

Friday 5th of June 2015
7-9Pm  
German Deli
Unit1, Hamlet Industrial Estate
96 White Post Lane
London
E9 5EN

HACKNEY WICK AND FISH ISLAND: FUTURE(S) PERFECT Workshop

workshop exploring the past and future imaginings ofHackneyWickand Fish Island


Sandwiched between a dual carriageway and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Hackney Wick and Fish Island have for some time been bastions of alternative living and working in the London.  
The onset of the development of the Olympic legacy has led many – including developers, local authorities, residents and the media - to speculate on the possible future of the area, leading to a cacophony of multiple, contradictory and even conflictive visions, with various different interests and desires being mapped onto the neighbourhoods...


Workshop Facilitators

Andreas Lang 
is an architect, and educator. He is a co-founder of London based practice Public Works which operates in between the fields of art, architecture and design. Public Works' projects explore how the urban public realm can be shaped by its users, through participation and co-production.

Mara Ferreri 
is an urban researcher interested in the potential of temporary art/activist practices in spaces of contested urban transformation. She completed her PhD thesis, titled 'Occupying Vacant Spaces: Precarious Politics of Temporary Urban Reuse', in the School of Geography at QMUL, where she is currently a post-doctoral research assistant.

Rhiannon Firth 
is post-doctoral research fellow at the Cass School of Education and Communities at the University of East London. Her work focuses on alternative lifestyles, utopias, social movements and counter-culture and the relationship to politics, participation and social change

Venue: Stour space 7 roach road, hackney wick, london, e3 2pa 
Booking: The event is free but places are limited, please book your seat here

CHARTER OF THE FOREST RE-WILDING AND  FOR THE LOVE OF TREES, THURSDAY NOVEMBER 6TH 2014, 7PM


Join us for Wick Session No.22 on Thursday the 6th of November 2014 at 7PM:

CHARTER OF THE FOREST
RE-WILDING
FOR THE LOVE OF TREES

A celebration of the anniversary of The Charter of the Forest, which was first issued on 6 November 1217 as a complementary charter to the Magna Carta. This gave commoning rights to common people in England's forest, heaths and chases. The evening will start with a talk by Ben Cowell, Regional Director, National Trust & trustee of Our Democratic Heritage, on The Charter of the Forests, the Magna Carta, and the New Commons, followed by: Rewilding, a performance workshop by The FLOCK / Grow Art Collective and end with For the love of trees: a short dramatic monologue by Natasha Langridge. The session is organised by Occupy London, hosted by R-Urban Wick as part of The New Putney Debates.

Attendance is free but signing up for a ticket here will give the organisers an idea of audience numbers

THURSDAY 6TH NOVEMBER 2014, 7PM
The White Building
Unit 7 Queens Yard
White Post Lane
London E9 5EN
Nearest station Hackney Wick overground

Ben Cowell on The Charter of the Forest: Then and Now
Henry III's Charter of the Forest was issued on 6 November 1217, as an adjunct to the reissued Great Charter of Liberties. Indeed, it was in order to differentiate the Charter of the Forest from the Charter of Liberties that the latter gained the name 'Magna Carta', being the longer of the two documents. Several of the liberties reaffirmed in the Charter of the Forest dated from the first version of Magna Carta, sealed by Henry's father King John in June 1215. The Charter of the Forest, however, dealt exclusively with the rights and liberties that the king's subjects held over land, in particular the open forests, heaths, commons and wastes that had multiple uses in the medieval economy.The Charter of the Forest therefore disclosed a customary relationship with the natural world, which by and large was extinguished in the centuries that followed as a consequence of enclosure, urbanisation and industrialisation. What lessons might we learn today from the Charter of the Forest, and the reassertion of a more communal and collaborative approach to the custodianship of our precious natural resources?Ben Cowell is Regional Director for the National Trust in the East of England, and a trustee of Our Democratic Heritage and The Heritage Alliance.

Rewilding – a performance workshop by The FLOCK/ Grow Art collective.
Re-wilding – a workshop/performance on the dynamic between the space of a city and the space of nature. Through a combination of intuitive and guided movements, this workshop will explore the inherent dynamics of the two spaces and how they are felt through the individual body as well as the body of the group. The exploration is done at a primal and intuitive level and all participants are welcome, there is no requirement of previous movement/theatre experience. - Grow Art Collective

Natasha Langridge will give a reading from an extract of her monologue – For the Love of Trees:
If I look outside my window to the left cranes and drills are in my face. I could touch the builders if I stretched out far enough. I don't. I look to my right. And down. Into the little park. A Cherry tree is just beneath me. And beneath that a bench. Where city lovers steal a kiss in the chaos of London mornings, where Moroccan elders meet their sons to light up a Tagine for lunch, where a Granny hands out the best supermarket deals of the day as birds sing of other day to day stuff. I am still writing about my lost lover. Until one day at half past three. The bulldozers thunder into the green. Men in orange jackets section the park into three. The Mayor of London logo blazes. In the space of one hour eight trees are chopped to stumps. Diggers turn the grass to rubble. A black bird sings wildly. A crane moves stealthily towards the cherry tree... - One woman's personal experience of regeneration.

WICK SESSION NO.21: MOIBLE ECOLOGIES, SAT 20TH SEPTEMBER 4PM, QUEEN ELIZABETH OLYMPIC PARK


Wick Session No.21: Mobile Ecologies will take place as part of the Art Moves exhibition held in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Mobile Ecologies will bring together a diverse range speakers who initiated mobile projects which have a broader ecological interest. A series of short presentation will be followed by a discussion, highlighting the ecological ambitions behind the projects and explore the cultures and practices of 'doing things mobile'.

Saturday 21st September 2014, 4-6pm
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Mandeville Place (see map below)

Lise Autogena is a Professor of Cross Disciplinary Art at Sheffield Hallam University. Together with Joshua Portway and composer Orlando Gough she created the Foghorn Requiem in 2013, a community portrait of the maritime North East in the form of a requiem performed by the Souter Foghorn, three brass bands and fifty ships on the North Sea. Lise Autogena will talk about her work aboard the vessel Zeldenrust III, a 28 meter Dutch ex-commercial motor ship on the Thames in central London. Her talk will touch upon urban water space wars, water-based traditions and dreams of alternative futures on the waterways of Europe.

Pilot Publishing was initiated by Ella Gibbs and Amy Plant in 2004 following the project Laburnum Pilot – A Street Magazine. Since then they have worked together and with communities in a variety of locations from allotment gardens to underground stations. With an expanded notion of 'Publishing', the artists activate alternatives inspired by and for communication. Each project is guided by a 'rule' or set of rules and is a 'Pilot'. So the larger projects are often prototypes, experiments or tests, with longevity in mind. Ella lives in London and Amy has lived in the US since 2011. Ella Gibbs will be talking about the 'Energy Cafe', a horse trailer transformed into a mobile off-grid community kitchen. Initially to reinvigorating a feeling of the original 'commons' at Gunpowder Park where land was used as a resource for all. Energy Cafe had three rules: everything was made from recycled materials - found and donated, food was foraged or farmed within a six mile radius and all the energy was generated off-grid using bicycle power, solar and waste or local wood.

Umi Baden-Powell is a maker, artist and designer based in London. Conceptually, she is concerned with 'urban nomadism', an investigation that looks at the depleting resources of the city. Her mobile structures and designs provide efficient use of what is currently available and also seek to extend access to space(s). Umi is the owner of a converted milk float called A-Float. She converted it so it can be used for exhibitions, a small space for groups to meet, covered seating, a little stage, a small office / residency. Whilst carrying out the conversion at a disused dairy in Streatham, she met a local resident who described the 'amazing milk float conventions' which took place inside the dairy during the 1970s with milk floats from all over Europe present.' This encounter inspired Floatilla - a contemporary milk float convention displaying milk floats that have been adapted to serve new purposes. Floatilla aims to bring together the plethora of modified milk floats within the UK and explore the multitude of imaginative possibilities that they each demonstrate.